Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Understanding Scott "Homey" Pritchett

To know Scott "Homey" Pritchett is to know a man who has never been chained by societal norms. Shaped by a natural love for surfing, wanderlust, and building lifelong connections,

Pritchett is a unique mix between an intense motivational speaker and Jeff Spicoli, the weed-crazed surfer from "Fast Times At Ridgemont High."

Pritchett has spent a significant portion of his life molding young minds, imparting surf/life wisdom on others. He takes strong pride in cultivating the mindset of others, establishing a presence others seem to eat off.

 Hockey was Pritchett's initial  love. He learned the trade from an early age, maturing into a beyond-his-years ice skater.

Pritchett went on to captain the sponsored Triple-A Little Caesers Forum team. He traveled from city-to-city plying his trade on the ice. During those long road trips, Pritchett self-educated by talking with teachers and coaches on the bus. He is quick to cite this this as a source for a majority of his childhood education.

Pritchett earned five straight Player of the Year awards at right wing, his eyes pasted on a possible professional career.

Initially, Pritchett was petrified of the water. The movie "Jaws' had traumatized him as a child. When he landed in tropical but drug-addled Lake Worth, Fla., that fear of sharks suddenly decreased.

This was a huge transformation for Pritchett, no longer haunted by the ocean.

 In Michigan, Pritchett's distaste for the water was so monstrous he would take baths wearing underwear. Then, one day, his mentality changed entirely. This moment solidified the transition from the ice rink to the surf.

With a skateboard, Pritchett rode five miles to the then-localized beach in Lake Worth, Fla. It was at Lake Worth that Pritchett stumbled upon Daron Knowlton and Nathan Knowlton, both legendary surfers cruising through waves.

From that moment on, there was no fear of sharks. He would forget about JAWS and the impact the horrific impact the film had on his early life. Homey jumped into the ocean as if God had embraced him, fending off his longtime fear of the water.

"I asked them, 'what on earth are you guys doing?' Pritchett recalls.

"I said, 'you guys are walking on water. I knew, at that moment, for the rest of my life, I wanted to have that feeling. From that exact second, I knew I was going to be a surfer for the rest of my life."

Rather than taking the expected route and attending college, Pritchett developed a marketing mindset by studying the ways of Vincent McMahon. Thus, he developed an innate feel for entrepreneurial trade. This mindset enabled Pritchett to kick-start a number of businesses in his later life.

With Motor Blower Media, Pritchett built a family-operated media outlet which represents family-owned businesses. It is, as Pritchett explains, for his children. He took the project into his own hands and is steadily engaged in it.

As a professional skateboarder, Pritchett was sponsored by BillaBong for 12 years. His relationship with the company soured, however, when they refused to help pay his medical bills. Pritchett sustained numerous injuries during his time as a professional skateboarder.

He never received financial assistance with his growing list of medical bills. This greatly altered Pritchett's perception of Corporate America. It was at this moment, Pritchett noted, he decided to pursue family-owned business and avoid involvement in corporate life.

He was sponsored by Billabong since his teenage years. During these times, he became a professional surfer and garnered numerous East Coast championships.

Prtichett graduated SantaLuces High School with a 3.65 GPA, rising to the top of the class with an unrivaled work ethic and burning desire to learn more. When Pritchett moved to South Florida, he turned the rudder over hard from the ice rink to the beach.

Rather than taking the expected route and attending college, Pritchett developed a marketing mindset by studying the ways of Vincent McMahon as a child. He developed a feel for entrepreneurial trade, helping kick-start a number of businesses in his later life.

With a natural knack for crushing waves, Pritchett became one with the ocean. He's attended more concerts than he cares to count, striving to break the world record for most concerts ever attended (statistics unknown)He

He dabbles into all forms of music. Possessing a love for heavy metal, punk rock, rock n' roll and hip-hop of the early 1990s, Pritchett has studied high-potency lyricists and discovered meaning in their messages.

Pritchett still remains an avid fan of Iced-T, a legendary rapper who etched his legacy in California. Old school rap and the originals have a special appeal to Pritchett, as he continues to develop long-lasting friendships with those from all walks of life. It is in concert stadiums and on the ocean where Pritchett said he feels most alive, tapping into that inner comfort zone. Becoming sober and kicking a once-troubling drug problem, Pritchett now serves as an inspirational source for those in recovery.

Beyond providing guidance and personal consultation, Pritchett allows those undergoing drug problems to free their minds through group activities and powerful analogies.

 Adversity is no stranger to Pritchett. He's overcome drug addiction, bounced back from 10 knee operations, and constantly battled devastating injuries which all but derailed his surfing career.

The injuries and setbacks were never too arduous for Pritchett. He's made his livelihood slaying adverse obstacles and overcoming setbacks. Having endured so much, Pritchett views pain and adversity as non-factors incapable of hindering one's life progress. In fact, the mental strength gained from these experiences can only benefit us in the long run, as Pritchett preaches.

These are just some of the pivotal points he illustrates in detailed, engaging dialogue.

Christian Fletcher, the iconic aerial surfer who mastered surf-rebel extremism, has been a regular associate of Pritchett's. They are in the process of building up Madhouse Customs, a spanking new company in California. Madhouse Customs features muscle cars, motorbikes, and intergalactic surf crafts.

Living a life defined by sobriety, the man they call "Homey" plans to implement his very own rehab community in his Action Sports Training Facility.

With Action Sports Training, Pritchett will open the doors for those seeking drug and alcohol treatment. Action Sports Training is part of his non-profit, Keep The Dream Alive. Homey's commitment to the kids, he says, was the reason for his involvement in Keep The Dream Alive. Caring about others, rather than being consumed by his own self-interest, helped propel him as a person. He believes that by caring more for others and less about himself, his world changed dramatically.

Pritchett vows to continue a life journey of sobriety while grooming a torrent of young surfing talent and innovative thinkers. Action Sports Training Facility will also feature amenities for those as intrigued by skateboarding and other action sports as Pritchett.

His goal is to build the first mega ramp in Florida, a project Pritchett currently finds himself immersed in.

Pritchett is from a stable family, raised by two loving parents who did everything in their power to make his life comfortable. His father was a Teamsters Truck Driver. His mother was a stay-at-home Mom, molding her son's interest before he shifted his gaze to traveling the world and using surfing as a tool for community engagement.

Pritchett currently resides in South Florida, where he lives with his beautiful Filipino wife, Shelly Tognacci-Pritchett. The couple have two kids, 15-year-old Skyler and nine-year-old Karver.